Future Pacific Voice Conferences

XXIII Pacific Voice Conference (PVC) & VI World Voice Consortium Congress – Voice in the Silicon Valley: Better results through innovation & technology

Dear Voice and Speech Professional,

The Organizing Committee of the XXIII Annual Pacific Voice Conference (PVC) and the VI International Congress of the World Voice Consortium (WVC) announces the upcoming venue “Voice in the Silicon Valley: Better results through innovation & technology” will be held conjointly on October 2-3, 2015 at Santa Clara University (SCU) and on October 4, 2015 at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music (SFCM) for the 3rd day of this international venue focusing on “Artistic Voice: Innovations in Care and Pedagogy.”

SCU is the oldest California University and is located in the heart of the Silicon Valley, in Santa Clara, CA, USA.

Founded in 1971, the SFCM is the oldest conservatory in the American West and has earned an international reputation for producing musicians of the highest caliber.

The Organizing Committee welcomes you to participate in this world voice venue. Please take time to consider submitting your contribution to this prestigious voice/speech world event.

Cordially,
Krzysztof Izdebski, Chairman, PVSF
Yuling Yan, Professor, SCU
Lindsay Reder, USC
Manuel Pais-Clemente, President, WVC

Overview

This event covers a broad spectrum of areas related to voice medicine, voice technology, voice care, and voice in the performing arts. Specifically, we focus on intelligent solutions to above topics from an international and interdisciplinary viewpoint.

Objectives

  • To provide State–of–the–Art information on applications of technology to the fields of voice/speech medicine, homeland security, performing arts, and the entertainment industry
  • To incorporate technological principals into care, treatment, and prevention of voice and speech problems
  • To incorporate technology into performance monitoring and evaluating
  • To explore the role of voice/speech in homeland security
  • To explore the role of voice and speech gestures in emotional detection